Tom Petty’s music sales leap 6,216% in wake of artist’s death

Tom Petty’s music sales leap 6,216% in wake of artist’s death



Sales of Tom Petty’s music have drastically increased following the singer’s death this week at 66.


Petty, a Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, went into cardiac arrest Monday morning and died at 8:40 p.m. that evening, at the UCLA Medical Center. He was surrounded by family, bandmates and friends, according to his manager Tony Dimitriades.


Sales of the late rock star’s music skyrocketed in the wake of his passing. According to TheWrap, with numbers obtained by music sales tracker BuzzAngle Music, the Petty catalog increased 6,216% on Monday.


Over a four-day period prior to his death, Petty averaged 950 sales — which swelled to 60,000 on Monday, TheWrap points out.


The top track since the sales surge: 1989’s “Free Fallin’,” which sold 111 copies on the day prior to his death but 7,981 on Monday.

Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers perform on the 40th Anniversary Tour at Wrigley Field on Thursday, June 29, 2017, in Chicago. His sales rapidly increased after he passed away Oct. 2, 2017, after suffering cardiac arrest.

(Rob Grabowski/Rob Grabowski/Invision/AP)


In second place: 1989’s “I Won’t Back Down,” with 5,753 in sales on Monday (versus 67 the day before).


Trailing just behind that was the 1993 song “Mary Jane’s Last Dance,” which sold 5,156 copies on Monday (versus 104 prior to Petty’s death).


Numbers on streaming data are not available as of yet.


Petty had just completed a summer tour by spending three nights at the Hollywood Bowl — it was the band’s 40th anniversary.


As the BuzzAngle Music chart makes clear, Petty had an abundance of other hits across the decades. These include: “You Don’t Know How It Feels,” “Learning To Fly,” “American Girl,” “Wildflowers,” “Runnin’ Down A Dream,” “Refugee,” “Don’t Do Me Like That” and “Don’t Come Around Here No More.”


Find a snippet of Petty’s Hollywood Bowl performance, uploaded to YouTube on Sept. 26, below:

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